Business

Aftermath: Who’s who in Theresa May’s new Cabinet

After yesterday's chaotic reshuffle, Theresa May convenes a brand-new Cabinet this morning. But who will she have facing her around the table?

Foreign secretary Boris Johnson has gone. Brexit secretary David Davis has gone.

Although it's not quite the full reshuffle that some had hoped for, Theresa May seems to have a more successful rejig of her top team than she did in January – sources have indicated that yesterday's moves had been planned for.

Brexit secretary

One of the biggest gigs in Westminster – although Davis yesterday stressed the Prime Minister was really the person in charge – goes to one of the most ambitious. Dominic Raab has been a steady climber since he was elected in 2010, serving as a justice PPS from 2015, then justice minister from 2017. He was promoted in the January reshuffle to housing minister, but leaves that post after just six months – the seventh holder of that office in as many years. He is an ardent Leaver, but will now have to push May's Chequers proposal, which colleagues have blasted as Brino.

Foreign secretary

Jeremy Hunt is the new foreign secretary. The longest-standing Cabinet minister, he takes over Johnson's brief from health, where he was for nearly six years, making him the longest-serving health secretary in British history. Before that, he was culture secretary, where he introduced the controversial concept of local TV stations. He campaigned for Remain during the referendum, but has since switched sides and recently ruffled feathers by saying it was "inappropriate" for business to warn of the impact Brexit was having.

Health secretary

Fan of grime music and parkour, Matt Hancock has been catapulted from one of the most fun briefs into one of the most challenging. Another member of the 2010 intake, Hancock worked in a wide number of departments including energy, business and the Cabinet Office in junior roles, before becoming digital minister under Karen Bradley. He took on the culture secretary brief when she was moved to Northern Ireland. He also has his own app, which may stand him in good stead for grappling with the rise of health tech.

Culture secretary

Conversely, Jeremy Wright does not appear to have a natural affinity for the digital world. The former attorney general has no Twitter account – something which was seized on last night by, er, Twitter users. He has been an MP since 2005, and served in a junior post at the Ministry of Justice before becoming attorney general in 2014. He campaigned for Remain during the referendum.

Attorney general

Geoffrey Cox will also be attending this morning's Cabinet. He has been an MP since 2005, and campaigned to Leave during the 2016 referendum.

Other changes

Former deputy mayor Kit Malthouse has been made housing minister, taking on Raab's vacated position, while Chris Heaton-Harris – famous for having demanded the names of university lecturers teaching students about Brexit – has been made Brexit minister, replacing Steve Baker who resigned alongside Davis.

There were also a handful of PPS resignations, most significantly from Conor Burns, who was Johnson's right hand man. Transport secretary Chris Grayling's PPS Chris Green.

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Business

Aftermath: Who’s who in Theresa May’s new Cabinet

After yesterday's chaotic reshuffle, Theresa May convenes a brand-new Cabinet this morning. But who will she have facing her around the table?

Foreign secretary Boris Johnson has gone. Brexit secretary David Davis has gone.

Although it's not quite the full reshuffle that some had hoped for, Theresa May seems to have a more successful rejig of her top team than she did in January – sources have indicated that yesterday's moves had been planned for.

Brexit secretary

One of the biggest gigs in Westminster – although Davis yesterday stressed the Prime Minister was really the person in charge – goes to one of the most ambitious. Dominic Raab has been a steady climber since he was elected in 2010, serving as a justice PPS from 2015, then justice minister from 2017. He was promoted in the January reshuffle to housing minister, but leaves that post after just six months – the seventh holder of that office in as many years. He is an ardent Leaver, but will now have to push May's Chequers proposal, which colleagues have blasted as Brino.

Foreign secretary

Jeremy Hunt is the new foreign secretary. The longest-standing Cabinet minister, he takes over Johnson's brief from health, where he was for nearly six years, making him the longest-serving health secretary in British history. Before that, he was culture secretary, where he introduced the controversial concept of local TV stations. He campaigned for Remain during the referendum, but has since switched sides and recently ruffled feathers by saying it was "inappropriate" for business to warn of the impact Brexit was having.

Health secretary

Fan of grime music and parkour, Matt Hancock has been catapulted from one of the most fun briefs into one of the most challenging. Another member of the 2010 intake, Hancock worked in a wide number of departments including energy, business and the Cabinet Office in junior roles, before becoming digital minister under Karen Bradley. He took on the culture secretary brief when she was moved to Northern Ireland. He also has his own app, which may stand him in good stead for grappling with the rise of health tech.

Culture secretary

Conversely, Jeremy Wright does not appear to have a natural affinity for the digital world. The former attorney general has no Twitter account – something which was seized on last night by, er, Twitter users. He has been an MP since 2005, and served in a junior post at the Ministry of Justice before becoming attorney general in 2014. He campaigned for Remain during the referendum.

Attorney general

Geoffrey Cox will also be attending this morning's Cabinet. He has been an MP since 2005, and campaigned to Leave during the 2016 referendum.

Other changes

Former deputy mayor Kit Malthouse has been made housing minister, taking on Raab's vacated position, while Chris Heaton-Harris – famous for having demanded the names of university lecturers teaching students about Brexit – has been made Brexit minister, replacing Steve Baker who resigned alongside Davis.

There were also a handful of PPS resignations, most significantly from Conor Burns, who was Johnson's right hand man. Transport secretary Chris Grayling's PPS Chris Green.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *