France

Glance around France: Normandy mayors cry for help over coastal erosion

Normandy mayors appeal to government for help with coastal erosion

Coastal erosion is really taking its toll in the northern French region of Normandy.

In just a few months the beaches in the coastal towns of Bricqueville-sur-Mer and Bréhal have seen the coastline eroded by three to four metres, according to reports in the French press.

As a result, mayors in the region say homes are at risk and it's time the government started coughing up some cash to help local authorities solve the problem.

Mayor of Bricqueville-sur-Mer Hervé Bougon told the French press that the local authorities are forced to take expensive emergency measures while the government says it can cover between 60 and 80 percent of the cost.

However Bougon says that this isn't good enough.

"Getting sand back onto the beach costs €50,000," he said. "Everyone knows that our municipal budgets don't allow us to finance the rest."

This leaves with him with no choice but to strengthen the sand dunes that remain without replacing the sand, he argues.

"Why should it be up to the taxpayers of our small communities to pay to protect what is national territory?"

And Bougon is not alone in his views, with more than 30 other communes in Normandy seeking emergency funding from the government to help protect their areas from similar problems.

Rise in fuel thefts across France

The number of fuel thefts recorded by authorities since the beginning of the year is on the rise.

A total of nearly 10,000 fuel thefts have been recorded since January in France, with truck drivers, construction companies and farmers among the victims.

And with motorists becoming increasingly angry at the rising costs, the thefts are proving to be very lucrative.

Près de 10.000 vols de carburants ont été signalés depuis le début de l'année https://t.co/nfdu3TCWhj

— Capital (@MagazineCapital) November 6, 2018

Furious paramedics block roads outside Paris

There was traffic chaos outside the French capital early on Tuesday morning.

The reason was down to a go-slow operation, which affected the inner ring road between Porte de Bercy and Quai d'Ivry, carried out by angry paramedics.

The source of their anger was a recently introduced health transport financing reform which they fear will mean they have to cut costs.

Original Article

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